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An Introduction to the Wonderful World of Terpenes

When I first got involved with CBDs, I saw the term terpenes and wondered what that was/meant. Initially, I wasn’t sure if they mattered. As I’ve learned over time, Terpenes matter a great deal.

Here’s the textbook stuff. Terpenes are organic compounds found in fruits, herbs, and plants including both major strains of the cannabis genus. They have naturally occurring distinctive fragrances. Terpenes are the main contributor to the taste, color, and scent of all plant life, including again, both major strains of the cannabis genus. In case you don’t know it, that would be Weed and Hemp.

Terpenes can be sweet, spicy, piney, earthy, musky, bitter, smell like citrus, or any other description of a taste or scent of something. Terpenes in different foods, drinks, or flowers can be distinct enough to evoke different emotions. They can also bring back memories of different events or people that can stir a whole different set of emotions.

You know that incredibly groovy aroma coming out of your oven if you happen to bake NSFW brownies? That comes from a combination of various terpenes. Different strains of Weed and Hemp have their own signature smell and aromas that help those specific strains appeal to different people. Like I said earlier, terpenes matter a great deal.

Groovy Hemp Blog provides information on Organic, Non-GMO CBD Oil products along with other interesting subjects including terpenes.

Terpenes also appear to possess some medicinal properties and can be used to treat multiple symptoms including anxiety, depression, insomnia, and inflammation. In Hemp, there is an increasing amount of evidence that terpenes work with cannabinoids (CBD and related organic compounds and THC) to produce enhanced health benefits. This is referred to as the Entourage Effect.

For now, please keep in mind that only about eleven terpenes have been found at significant concentrations in cannabis to allow for research. Of those eleven terpenes, for right now we only pay attention to the six that are commonly found in even decent-sized concentrations.

The more prevalent Cannabinoid terpenes include:

  • Myrcene – Its aroma is musky, earthy, cloves and herbal and it‘s helpful for sedating and relaxing. Myrcene is an anti-inflammatory, sedative, and muscle relaxant and is useful for pain relief.
  • Limonene – It has a citrus aroma and  is helpful for stress relief and reduces anxiety. Limonene is also a mood elevator and anti-depressant and also helps relieves nausea.
  • Pinene – Its aroma is pine, fresh mountain air, slightly woody. But that surprised you endlessly. It will help you stay alert, boosts energy, improves focus and memory. Pinene is also a bronchodilator.
  • Caryophyllene – Its aroma is spicy, woody, and pepper. It provides pain relief, is an anti-depressant, an anti-inflammatory, and has anti-anxiety qualities.
  • Humulene – Its aroma is woody, earthy, herbal, and spicy. It has anti-inflammatory, appetite suppressant, pain relief, and anti-tumor qualities.
  • Linalool – Its aroma is floral, sugar, and citrus. It has anti-anxiety, sedative, pain relief, and anti-bacterial qualities.

Just to confuse the shit out of you, the listed terpene characteristics are not necessarily the final or only definition. I consider them baseline descriptions, a starting point. You can go online and find multiple variations on these terpene characteristics. Doing that might make you crazy but long-term, it’s always good to look at and learn different rational, intelligent, well-documented scientific perspectives.

Learning about terpenes is like the Cell Biology course I took in college. The first day of class, the professor told us that a lot of what we would learn early on would change during the semester. She wasn’t kidding. 

Our knowledge of terpenes and how they interact with cannabinoids is ever-expanding and changing. The rate of change will probably increase as time goes on. It’s exciting but it can also be frustrating as characteristics, definitions, and uses get sorted out after a lot of discovery, experimentation, and debate. That’s how it works in real science.

Aside from the approximately 200 different terpenes* identified in cannabis, there are thousands more in plants (and some animals) everywhere in nature. If you are optimistic, you could envision a world where terpenes and cannabinoids play a larger role in societal health and wellness. Myself, I am cautiously optimistic.

Dudes, Groovy Hemp Company thanks you once again for stopping by.

 

*Depending on who you read, there is evidence that there are “only” approximately 140 terpenes in cannabis.

An Introduction to the Wonderful World of Terpenes

When I first got involved with CBDs, I saw the term terpenes and wondered what that was/meant. Initially, I wasn’t sure if they mattered. As I’ve learned over time, Terpenes matter a great deal.

Here’s the textbook stuff. Terpenes are organic compounds found in fruits, herbs, and plants including both major strains of the cannabis genus. They have naturally occurring distinctive fragrances. Terpenes are the main contributor to the taste, color, and scent of all plant life, including again, both major strains of the cannabis genus. In case you don’t know it, that would be Weed and Hemp.

Terpenes can be sweet, spicy, piney, earthy, musky, bitter, smell like citrus, or any other description of a taste or scent of something. Terpenes in different foods, drinks, or flowers can be distinct enough to evoke different emotions. They can also bring back memories of different events or people that can stir a whole different set of emotions.

You know that incredibly groovy aroma coming out of your oven if you happen to bake NSFW brownies? That comes from a combination of various terpenes. Different strains of Weed and Hemp have their own signature smell and aromas that help those specific strains appeal to different people. Like I said earlier, terpenes matter a great deal.

Terpenes also appear to possess some medicinal properties and can be used to treat multiple symptoms including anxiety, depression, insomnia, and inflammation. In Hemp, there is an increasing amount of evidence that terpenes work with cannabinoids (CBD and related organic compounds and THC) to produce enhanced health benefits. This is referred to as the Entourage Effect.

For now, please keep in mind that only about eleven terpenes have been found at significant concentrations in cannabis to allow for research. Of those eleven terpenes, for right now we only pay attention to the six that are commonly found in even decent-sized concentrations.

Groovy Hemp Blog provides information on Organic, Non-GMO CBD Oil products along with other interesting subjects including terpenes.

The more prevalent Cannabinoid terpenes include:

  • Myrcene – Its aroma is musky, earthy, cloves and herbal and it‘s helpful for sedating and relaxing. Myrcene is an anti-inflammatory, sedative, and muscle relaxant and is useful for pain relief.
  • Limonene – It has a citrus aroma and  is helpful for stress relief and reduces anxiety. Limonene is also a mood elevator and anti-depressant and also helps relieves nausea.
  • Pinene – Its aroma is pine, fresh mountain air, slightly woody. But that surprised you endlessly. It will help you stay alert, boosts energy, improves focus and memory. Pinene is also a bronchodilator.
  • Caryophyllene – Its aroma is spicy, woody, and pepper. It provides pain relief, is an anti-depressant, an anti-inflammatory, and has anti-anxiety qualities.
  • Humulene – Its aroma is woody, earthy, herbal, and spicy. It has anti-inflammatory, appetite suppressant, pain relief, and anti-tumor qualities.
  • Linalool – Its aroma is floral, sugar, and citrus. It has anti-anxiety, sedative, pain relief, and anti-bacterial qualities.

Just to confuse the shit out of you, the listed terpene characteristics are not necessarily the final or only definition. I consider them baseline descriptions, a starting point. You can go online and find multiple variations on these terpene characteristics. Doing that might make you crazy but long-term, it’s always good to look at and learn different rational, intelligent, well-documented scientific perspectives.

Learning about terpenes is like the Cell Biology course I took in college. The first day of class, the professor told us that a lot of what we would learn early on would change during the semester. She wasn’t kidding. 

Our knowledge of terpenes and how they interact with cannabinoids is ever expanding and changing. The rate of change will probably increase as time goes on. It’s exciting but it can also be frustrating as characteristics, definitions, and uses get sorted out after a lot of discovery, experimentation, and debate. That’s how it works in real science.

Aside from the approximately 200 different terpenes* identified in cannabis, there are thousands more in plants (and some animals) everywhere in nature. If you are optimistic, you could envision a world where terpenes and cannabinoids play a larger role in societal health and wellness. Myself, I am cautiously optimistic.

Dudes, Groovy Hemp Company thanks you once again for stopping by.

 

*Depending on who you read, there is evidence that there are “only” approximately 140 terpenes in cannabis.

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